Tag Archives: Craft

The Master Butcher’s Singing Club

I’m working on a novel right now dealing heavily with music, and was originally attracted to Louise Erdrich’s The Master Butcher’s Singing Club based on its content–I wanted to see how another writer handled music, in both its description and … Continue reading

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Andrea Lunsford’s Talk at DePaul

Last Friday, as part of an on-going program for professional development, made possible by a shiny new departmental budget, DePaul University’s Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse Department hosted Andrea Lunsford, author of (among other things) The St. Martin’s Handbook for Writing. … Continue reading

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Puzzled Writers, Dramatic Situations

I recently spent the night at a friend’s house, and since I’m almost always the first to get up in the morning I killed a few hours raiding his library.  After browsing the shelves of anthologies, journals, and short story … Continue reading

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The Medici Effect

While riding a commuter train from Chicago to St. Louis earlier today (the train being a new addition to my annual Christmas migration back to my hometown) I read The Medici Effect by Frans Johansson, which claims that creativity, while … Continue reading

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Wherefore Art Thou, Alison?

Alison Lurie’s lecture, which I almost didn’t attend on account of fatigue–similar to the kind you might feel from so many Sewanee updates–was a basically insightful lecture focusing on an often neglected element of fiction: setting. I admit that I … Continue reading

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Sex and Politics (well, perhaps just sex)

The first lecture at Sewanee was by John Casey, and centered around sex in literature–how it is handled, when it is worth writing about, and what about it is worth fixating upon.  He mentioned, by introduction, that Updike said he … Continue reading

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He’s Not Flat, He’s Just a Character

On Thursday afternoon, James Wood–noted essayist/critic and senior editor of The New Republic–gave a discussion he claimed might well be titled, “In Defense of Flat Characters.”  It is difficult to summarize because it was essentially an upcoming book chapter, and … Continue reading

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“Academic” vs. “Creative” Writing: Hidden Parallels

As I mentioned, I teach First Year Writing — a variation on your standard university course, emphasizing research, argumentation, audience awareness, etc — at DePaul University .  The goal for the course is to write an 8-10 page term paper, … Continue reading

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